Parenting Coordination – a new approach to resolving ongoing parental conflict.

Disputes and conflict do not always end after court orders or agreements have been reached. The nature of drawn-out family law disputes can mean that conflict becomes entrenched and is hard to overcome. Parents don’t necessarily have the right tools to move on from what’s happened in the past and focus positively on their future co-parenting arrangement. 

I often hear from parents “What now? How can I co-parent after everything that’s happened?”

Parenting Coordination is a new area of family law to help parents resolve minor disputes and adhere to parenting orders and agreements. We work with both parents in a safe, collaborative and child-focused manner. 

Parenting Coordinators are recommended by the Court, ICL, Lawyer, a Mediator, or direct by parents.

A Parenting Coordinator will meet with you monthly (or as required) and can help you with

  • Ongoing coaching and education in post-separation communication. 
  • Conflict resolution, anger management and self-regulation. 
  • Meeting the requirements of court orders or consent agreements. 
  • Mediating on-going disagreements and facilitating improved capacity for reaching agreements on minor disputes yourselves. 
  • Promote healthy relationships between children and both parents. 
  • Prevent re-litigation due to contraventions. 

Parenting Coordination helps to minimise stress on all the family. As a trained facilitator, my commitment is to help you learn new strategies and create new patterns so you can each move on with your lives and be the best parent you can be for your children. 

Children’s outcomes after separation and divorce are improved when parents have the least amount of conflict. I know you want the best for your children, and my aim is to help you be the best you can be.

Contact Jasmin Newman for more information via Jasmin Newman Mediation

The Leaver and The Left

There is a concept in separation and divorce in which there is often a disparity between where each party are emotionally in relation to the separation.

While some couples come to the decision together, in many cases one party has already made the decision to leave long before they’ve told the other. They are referred to as ‘the leaver’. This can cause a great deal of frustration for the person who is being left.

As you will see from the inserted graphic, the leaver is ahead at every stage. By the time they are making new plans and coming to terms with their life ahead, the left is only just finding out. This in itself can cause a great deal of conflict.

What happens then is the grief cycle for the left, which the leaver has already had time to come to terms with, is only just beginning. For the leaver, there are heightened emotions, often denial and sometimes still trying to save the relationship. This is discussed in full in the parenting after separation course.

The message I encourage separating parents to understand is to have an understanding that you are each on the same path but at different stages. You will ultimately both come to a place of acceptance, however, if you can respect that each of you is at different stages, this will go smoother.

Consider the graphic and where you are now.

Were you the leaver or the left?

Where is your co-parent at on this scale?

What do you think life looks for them now?

What do you think they experienced at various stages?

This is just some food for thought. You may not come up with all the answers you need right away. Processing relationship grief and loss is an individual journey and can take time. You will come through this in the end.